Enterprises Don’t Have Big Data, They Just Have Bad Data

PayPal co-founder and venture capitalist Peter Thiel commonly harps on the tech community for overusing buzzwords like “cloud” and “big data.” He’s not the only one who’s been saying this, but the message still doesn’t appear to be sinking in with most enterprises.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: techcrunch.com

By Jeremy Levy. Applying BigData to your business.

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The End of Work as We Know It

Technology in the form of automation and digital intermediaries like Uber are fundamentally transforming the job market. Rather than try to stop the unstoppable, we should think about how to put this new reality at the service of our values and welfare.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.project-syndicate.org

By Jean Pisani-Ferry. Rather than try to stop the unstoppable, we should think about how to put this new reality at the service of our values and welfare. 

See on Scoop.itThe New way of Work

Big City Telecom Infrastructure is Often Ancient: Conduits 70+ Years Old, Wiring from 1960s-1980s

As late as the 1970s, New York Telephone (today Verizon) was still maintaining electromechanical panel switches in its telephone exchanges that were developed in the middle of World War I and installed in Manhattan between 1922-1930. Reliance on infrastructure 40-50 years old is nothing new for telephone companies across North America. A Verizon technician in New York City is just as likely to descend into tunnels constructed well before they were born as is a Bell technician in Toronto.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: stopthecap.com

By Phillip Dampier. Outdated telecom infrastructures – time for replacement.

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Data, Data Everywhere, But Not A Bit You Own

Who owns data? How should data privacy be defined and protected? And what is the potential for regulation to support or impede the growth of digital data businesses? Those were among the tough questions panelists at the Techonomy Policy 2015 event in Washington last week grappled with during a session headlined “Privacy Collides with Data in a Transparent World.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com

Techonomy – Forbes. #BigData and data ownership.

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Hekademia | Blog Post

Automated learning pathways are currently a hot topic in discussions on education because those pathways have the potential to personalize learning and provide timely intervention for students.  With automated pathways, also known as adaptive learning, the instruction changes based on the students’ current levels of understanding. In some cases, adaptive learning is teacher-directed. In this case, teachers push new content to their students based on the learners’ previous performances. In other cases, the pathways are “system-generated” so the technology “automatically” adapts to meet the needs of individual students. The latter option is far more controversial because it elicits this question: Are algorithms replacing teachers?  What if the system “misunderstands” and doesn’t provide students with the proper support and intervention?

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.hekademia.com

By Nicki Darbyson. When we think about technology creating adaptive pathways for students, remember that each pathway was programmed by someone

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In the future, employees won’t exist | IEyeNews

Contract work is becoming the new normal. Consider Uber: The ride-sharing startup has 160,000 contractors, but just 2,000 employees. That’s an astonishing ratio of 80 to 1. And when it comes to a focus on contract labor, Uber isn’t alone. Handy, Eaze and Luxe are just a few of the latest entrants into the “1099 Economy.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.ieyenews.com

By Tad Milbourn. The future of the Workforce.

See on Scoop.itThe New way of Work

Most VPNs leak user details, study shows

Researchers have found nearly 80% of popular VPN providers leak information about the user because of a vulnerability known as IPv6 leakage

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.computerweekly.com

By Warwick Ashford. Most virtual private network (VPN) services used by hundreds of thousands of people to protect their identity online are vulnerable to leaks, a study has revealed.

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