Google+ ten dode opgeschreven na vertrek Vic Gundotra?

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Google+ ten dode opgeschreven na het vertrek van Vic Gundotra? Nergens op gebaseerd. Veel speculatie en gegoochel met feiten!

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

En dit heeft geleid tot bashen van +TechCrunch op #GooglePlus. En terecht. Tenditieuze berichtgeving.

See on www.letterzaken.nl

Beware Simpson’s Paradox

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When I first heard of the “Simpson’s Paradox,” I immediately thought of my favorite TV show, The Simpsons. Nope. Wrong. Simpson’s Paradox refers to a statistical situation in which a trend or relationship that is observed within multiple groups disappears when the groups are combined. Simpson’s Paradox is in a sense an arithmetic trick:  weighted averages can lead to reversals of meaningful relationships—i.e., a trend or relationship that is observed within each of several groups reverses when the groups are combined. As data scientists, we need to be aware of the counter-intuitive analytic results resulting from Simpson’s paradox.

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

Very interesting article by Bill Schmarzo (@Schmarzo) on #bigdata #analytics.

See on infocus.emc.com

Disruptive technologies pose difficult ethical questions for society

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Alex Howard comments on questions about ethics and ethos in an age of exponential technological change.

 

“Many of the technologists involved in data aggregation see a benefit to civil society,” wrote Quentin Hardy, in a New York Times column on the disappearance of urban anonymity when all data is tracked.

 

Ethicists, researchers, and corporate compliance officers, by way of contrast, may see risks to privacy and civil rights from “big data.”

Over the years, I’ve encountered, channeled, or challenged different strains of technology-fueled optimism and pessimism regarding the impact of new technologies on society. I read a perspective that mixed some of both last week, published on the servers of MIT’s Technology Review, when Stanford fellow Vivek Wadhwa argued that laws and ethics can’t keep pace with technology.

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

#Bigdata and disruptive #technologies: curse or blessing? 

See on www.techrepublic.com

6 Factors to Have Leadership Presence | Switch and Shift

See on Scoop.itAbout leadership

Yes, how you lead is important. Why you lead, though, is far more interesting and more powerful. When you combine the how and the why, you have a dynamic interaction that helps emerge your leadership presence.

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

Shawn Murphy: How you lead is important. Why you lead is far more interesting. #leadership

See on switchandshift.com

When Convictions Blind Leaders

See on Scoop.itAbout leadership

Many leaders are passionate individuals, often highly driven by deeply held philosophical convictions or values. This can make them very influential but can also cause them and others to lose sight of potential trip wires.

 

Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/when-convictions-blind-leaders-3320?nopaging=1#iDpZbF69uhdkCfh7.99

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

Schon Beechler (@ProfBeechler) on @Insead

See on knowledge.insead.edu

Simple Leadership

See on Scoop.itAbout leadership

The more complicated you try to make leadership the more complicated it will be to lead.

 

Some people like to make leadership really really complicated. I think they do that in order to put “leaders” or those with leadership titles on a pedestal of some kind. 

 

The more complicated “leading” is the more valuable a “leader” becomes, or so the popular thinking seems to go. The problem with that thinking is this: leadership is not complicated.

 

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

@LeadToday pleas to keep #leadership simple

See on stevekeating.me

De middenmanager werkt niet thuis, of toch wel?

See on Scoop.itThe New way of Work

Onlangs faciliteerde ik een intervisiebijeenkomst van een zestal  managers, allen werkzaam in een, zoals dat zo mooi heet, kennisintensieve omgeving. De onderwerpen die de revue passeerden waren op hun eigen verzoek geagendeerd en hadden betrekking op hoe ze met hun teams werkten.

 

Een van die onderwerpen was ‘het nieuwe werken’. Nu is daar al veel over geschreven naar aanleiding van menig onderzoek dat gedaan is, maar hier ging het niet om een bijdrage aan de theorievorming. De vraag, of beter gezegd de stelling die op tafel lag, was de volgende: “ik vind niet dat ik kan thuiswerken”.

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

Hoe actueel. Als de NS haar plannen doorzet kunnen ze het wel 😉

#Flexwerken #Managers
door Richard van der Lee (@Visieoptalent) 

See on centuryoftalent.wordpress.com

The Right Colors Make Data Easier To Read

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What is the color of money? Of love? Of the ocean? In the United States, most people respond that money is green, love is red and the ocean is blue. Many concepts evoke related colors — whether due to physical appearance, common metaphors, or cultural conventions. When colors are paired with the concepts that evoke them, we call these “semantically resonant color choices.”

 

Artists and designers regularly use semantically resonant colors in their work. And in the research we conducted with Julie Fortuna, Chinmay Kulkarni, and Maureen Stone, we found they can be remarkably important to data visualization.

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

#BigData visualization works better with the right colorscheme.
Semantically resonant color assignment 

See on blogs.hbr.org