▶ The Story of Electronics 2010 – YouTube

▶ The Story of Electronics 2010 – YouTube.

The Story of Electronics, releasing Tuesday, NOVEMBER 9, employs the Story of Stuff style to explore the high-tech revolution’s collateral damage—25 million tons of e-waste and counting, poisoned workers and a public left holding the bill. Host Annie Leonard takes viewers from the mines and factories where our gadgets begin to the horrific backyard recycling shops in China where many end up. The film concludes with a call for a green ‘race to the top’ where designers compete to make long-lasting, toxic-free products that are fully and easily recyclable.

Sharing is a cultural right, not a market failure – Communs / Commons

An endless stream of law proposals, soft-law initiatives and free-trade agreements keeps trying to eradicate or prevent the non-market sharing of digital works between individuals. New strategies are pushed using incentives and threats so that intermediaries will police the Internet to save the scarcity-based business models of a few from the competition of abundance. So is it business as usual? Well, no longer.

There are strong signs that citizens and digital rights organizations have reached a new maturity in what used to be the “piracy” debate. For many years, they of course stressed the damage that the war against piracy was doing to the Internet, to freedoms and fundamental rights. However, many seemed to have forgotten that the initiators of file sharing … called it file sharing. They feared standing explicitly for its legitimacy and looked for schemes that would buy peace in the war against P2P. They pushed for blanket licensing or licence globale proposals whether optional or compulsory that proposed to compensate a limited set of industries motion picture, phonographic industry and a lesser extent TV for the harm allegedly caused by unauthorized sharing.

read article: Sharing is a cultural right, not a market failure – Communs / Commons.

Do We Really Need to Work?

Unemployment has been on the rise lately, pretty much anywhere. We could attribute this to the economic crisis, but economies (except for some parts of Europe) have been growing. Even those parts of Europe which haven’t been growing have shown an increase in unemployment that does not mirror the decrease in GDP.

Interesting blog On David Yerle Writes

Do We Really Need to Work?.

The different types of cooperation | Deskmag | Coworking

See on Scoop.itCooperative capitalism

Coworking is based on cooperation. The topic is explored in depth in a recent book ‘Together’ from American sociologist Richard Sennett. But not all forms of cooperation stand for coworking or provide benefits for everyone. We look at what types of collaboration he distinguishes for us, taken from a section of his book. Those who desire more insight into the future of collaborations and those who want to learn more about the future of work, would be encouraged to attend the Work in Progress conference Hamburg, at the end of this month.
See on www.deskmag.com

Book of the Day: Economic Democracy in Action

See on Scoop.itCooperative capitalism

Book: After Capitalism: Economic Democracy in Action. Dada Maheshvarananda. Innerworld Publications, 2012

 

A grassroots movement for economic democracy based on cooperatives and local economies is quickly growing throughout the planet. After Capitalism, inspired by P.R. Sarkar’s Progressive Utilization Theory, offers a compelling vision of an equitable, sustainable model which economically empowers individuals and communities. Filled with successful examples from six continents as well as many resources, activities and tools for activists, After Capitalism will fill you with hope and the conviction that a new, democratic economy is indeed possible.

See on blog.p2pfoundation.net

Project of the Day: Friendsurance

See on Scoop.itCooperative capitalism

“Friendsurance has a very unique and revolutionary approach to insurance. By using the power of social networks, your service is able to offer liability, legal and household insurance at a very low rate. Tim, how would you describe your business model in a few sentences?

John Lasschuit ®™‘s insight:

Is more or less what I’ve described as a new economic banking system, based on social networks.

See on blog.p2pfoundation.net